Tag Archives: Choral Singing

Courage at Twilight: Choir Practice

When church services ended, Mom led me to choir practice, held in the home of a neighbor.  The director was thrilled to have a new bass, and gave me a choir folder with my name on it, filled with favorites like Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing, Consider the Lilies, and John Rutter’s I Will Sing with the Spirit.  Mom was the ward choir director when I first started singing at the age of 12 in our New Jersey ward.  I learned from her so much about the beauty, complexity, and dynamics of choral singing and conducting.  She held this position for nine years.  In my forties, I was asked to direct the choir in my Utah ward.  I borrowed Mom’s choral music library, cleared the mental cobwebs, and put to work all the knowledge she taught me decades before.  At the same time, I sang in a wonderful Salt Lake City community choir, learning even more.  I have not sung with the church choir for a long time.  While choral singing can be uplifting and therapeutic, too much pain kept me away from people for too long.  I am happy to be singing again in the ward choir.  And as Mom expressed in choir practice today, “I am so grateful to be singing.”  Amen.

Courage at Twilight: Off to Church

We drive 200 yards to church—walking is just not an option.  I belong to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  First, a little context.  Our local church units are called wards.  The ward one attends depends on where one lives.  So, moving from Tooele to Sandy, my church record was transferred from the Westland Ward to the Crescent 18th Ward.  A bishop presides over each ward.  Every ward member is given the opportunity to contribute to the ward’s functioning (e.g., teaching youth classes) and to minister to the ward’s members.  All ward members serve voluntarily, without pay.  My first Sunday in the new ward, the bishop stood at the pulpit and invited to stand, telling the congregation of several hundred that I was new to the ward, and that I had moved in with my parents to help take care of them.  As I stood up, I resisted the almost irresistible urge to tuck in my shirt and pull up my slacks.  I am what I am; let them see me.  I felt the unusual nature of my situation: an older single man moving in with his octogenarian parents.  And I was sure Dad felt chagrined and being identified publicly as needing to be “taken care of.”  But these are all good people, many of whom approached me after the meeting to welcome me enthusiastically into the ward.  “I’m Brad.”  “I’m Ann.”  “I’m Bishop Callister.”  “So glad to meet you.  Your parents are such wonderful people.”